Tag Archives: legal

Court of Appeal confirms $10m commission on Gauguin sale

Posted on: May 17, 2019 by Michael Bowmer

On 14 May 2019 the Court of Appeal of England and Wales (Lewison LJ, Lindblom LJ, Rose LJ) unanimously dismissed the appeal by Ruedi Staechelin and his fellow trustees against the decision of Morgan J dated 16 January 2018. By his judgment Morgan J had held that a commission of US$10 million was payable to […]

Meet our Alumni: Becky Shaw, Senior Associate at Boodle Hatfield

Posted on: May 8, 2019 by Kiri Cragin Folwell

We are pleased to be launching a new series at the Institute of Art and Law featuring alumni from our courses. Becky Shaw, Senior Associate at Boodle Hatfield, participated in our Diploma in Art Law. Read about her background working with the art litigation team at Boodle Hatfield and experience with distance learning at the Institute […]

French report calls for massive restitution of African artefacts

Posted on: November 28, 2018 by Alexander Herman

Last week, French President Emmanuel Macron received the report he commissioned in March on the restitution of African artefacts currently held in French Museums. The commission followed the President’s speech in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, delivered one year ago today, in which he had called for “the conditions to be met within five years for the […]

Destruction of the Mosul mosque and the challenges of international law

Posted on: June 30, 2017 by Alexander Herman

Yesterday, during what appears to be the near-conclusion of the battle for Mosul in Iraq, Iraqi forces moved further into the centre of the old town and, as they did, came across the ruins of the famed al-Nuri Mosque. The 12th century mosque, the same holy site where the ISIS caliphate had been proclaimed in […]

New Sentencing Guidelines show their teeth

Posted on: April 20, 2016 by Emily Gould

It was heartening to read the report by Cahal Milmo in the i newspaper last week about the first application of the new Sentencing Guidelines for theft offences. The guidelines urge courts to take into account the special nature of heritage assets when sentencing offenders for theft crimes, giving official recognition to the devastating harm […]

Alexander Herman to address Courtauld law society

Posted on: February 15, 2016 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

The IAL’s Assistant Director, Alexander Herman, will be addressing the members of the Courtauld Institute Law Society in London this Wednesday, 17th February, at 6:00 pm. The  title of the talk will be ‘Art, Resolution and the Courts: At the nexus of art and law‘ and the talk will provide an overview of the matrix of […]

Proposed law in Scotland could affect museum objects

Posted on: September 25, 2015 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

A change to the law in Scotland could have an impact on objects left at museums, where the owner has disappeared or has become untraceable. The draft bill before the Scottish Parliament would first seek to introduce a 20 year positive prescription period, whereby a possessor of corporeal movable property (i.e. an object like a painting) would […]

Legal settlement reached between Getty and Armenian Church

Posted on: September 22, 2015 by Alexander Herman

An important legal settlement has been reached between the Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the American branch of an Armenian Church. The dispute, which had dragged on for a number of years, involved eight illustrated manuscript pages that had once been part of the Zeyt’un Gospels but which had been separated from the rest of the […]

Yassin, reuse and copyright

Posted on: July 29, 2015 by Alexander Herman

Those adventurous enough to explore the London area of Holland Park for their cultural fix (there is opera in the park after all), may have come across the house of Frederic (Lord) Leighton, which is open to the public as a museum. Leighton, who was President of the Royal Academy during the late Nineteenth Century, created the Victorian collector’s […]

A Spanish Tug-of-War

Posted on: May 8, 2015 by Alexander Herman

An interesting recent article in the New York Times recounts the struggle between two Spanish Museums over the right to display four paintings, including two masterpieces of European art (Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights and Rogier van der Weyden’s Descent from the Cross). The works have been held at the Prado Museum in Madrid since being sent […]