Tag Archives: copyright

Reacting to extremist German political propaganda – a moral rights issue?

Posted on: May 10, 2019 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

A lot of commotion was caused recently by a German right-wing party’s choice of political propaganda: the use of a 19thcentury painting with a very controversial slogan splashed across it. We are talking, of course, of Alternative fur Deutschland (AfD) and Jean-Léon Gérôme’s Slave Market, a painting from 1866 currently on loan to the Clark […]

The EU’s parting gift to the UK art market?

Posted on: April 1, 2019 by Emily Gould

On 12th March 2019, just over two weeks before the original date set for the UK’s exit from the European Union, the European Parliament adopted the Regulation on the import of cultural goods, a rather sweeping measure designed to control the import into EU Member States of certain items of cultural property. The legislation is […]

Copyright in AI works – what can we learn from our forebears?

Posted on: November 14, 2018 by Emily Gould

  Readers of this blog will have seen the post last week about Portrait of Edmond de Belamy, a piece of computer generated art created by the Obvious Collective through Artificial Intelligence, which recently sold at auction for USD 432,500. Amongst the challenges posed by AI technology for copyright law, is the question of how […]

Art, AI and copyright

Posted on: November 9, 2018 by Alexander Herman

A big splash was made when a lot sold at Christie’s New York last month for $432,500. That sort of amount is usually small change for the major international auction house, but not when it comes to a particular sort of artwork: one made by artificial intelligence (or AI). In fact, this was reported to […]

Art and Copyright: what can we learn from the past?

Posted on: October 29, 2018 by Emily Gould

Who does the modern law of copyright seek to protect? We are familiar today with the claim that artistic copyright protects artists and, perhaps, users of copyright works. Roll back 150 years, to the nineteenth century, and artistic copyright was also understood in a number of other ways, which are long forgotten today. For instance, […]

Museums and the Revised Digital Single Market Directive

Posted on: October 2, 2018 by Holly Woodhouse

On the 12th September 2018, the European Parliament adopted its revised negotiating position on the Digital Single Market Directive, including the controversial internet ‘link tax’ and ‘upload filter’, whilst adding some safeguards to protect small businesses and freedom of expression. Significantly, there are parts of this proposal that can have an impact on the museum world in […]

Rare Stik sculpture to be auctioned for charity tackling homelessness

Posted on: September 19, 2018 by Emily Gould

We’re delighted to share with you news that a rare sculpture by IAL friend and internationally renowned street artist Stik will be auctioned tomorrow, 20th September, by Christies, London, in aid of the charity Cardboard Citizens. Stik originally created the piece, entitled ‘Up on the Roof’, for a 2009 exhibition, and from 2010 it dwelt […]

Ticking Away: Christian Marclay’s The Clock and Copyright Law

Posted on: September 12, 2018 by Alexander Herman

A stern-looking man with a gun turns towards a metallic device mounted on the wall. He places one hand on the device’s handle and checks his watch. It is 12.04. Next we see an analogue clock hanging above a presenter reading the BBC radio news into a microphone. The time on the clock reads 12.05. […]

The Impact of Brexit on IP in the UK

Posted on: February 9, 2018 by Holly Woodhouse

The current intellectual property framework in the United Kingdom is underpinned by various international agreements, but is fundamentally shaped by EU Directives transposed into UK law.  With the Government yet to outline how transposed EU law will operate within the UK following the repeal of the European Communities Act 1972, the fate of the UK’s […]

Banksy’s Paint Pot Angel, legal rights and the art market

Posted on: January 19, 2018 by Alexander Herman

An interesting story has made it out of Bristol, the home city (apparently) of the elusive street artist Banksy. Back in 2009, Banksy had collaborated with the Bristol Museum and Art Gallery on an exhibition called Banksy versus Bristol Museum. In true Banksy style, it featured a burnt-out ice cream van on the Museum’s front […]