Latest IAL News

The Benin Bronzes – recent developments

Posted on: May 7, 2021 by Emily Gould

In mid-March this year, the German government announced that it was close to finalising plans to return to Nigeria Benin Bronzes from around 25 of its museums. The statement was swiftly followed by news of proposed returns from corners of the globe as disparate as Aberdeen and  California. Developments were also in evidence in the […]

Copyright in America

Posted on: April 20, 2021 by Alexander Herman

Every so often, we take a peek at the copyright situation in the USA. There are many reasons for this. Stateside, art and copyright cases are more plentiful than in the UK (and much of the world), perhaps because there is more at stake financially or simply because the culture is more litigious. Additionally, the […]

An art market without rules? The new Freeport opportunity in the UK

Posted on: April 15, 2021 by Eve Gatenby

“Our clients choose us because we have no priority above their property,” remarks the guide touring Robert Pattinson and John David Washington’s characters through a freeport in Christopher Nolan’s 2020 thriller Tenet. The underground vaults they are walking through are alluringly filled with artworks that give subtle hints at Impressionist and Abstract Expressionist masterpieces. These two characters […]

Meet our Alumni: Stephanie Drawdy, Attorney and Artist

Posted on: April 10, 2021 by Kiri Cragin Folwell

Stephanie Drawdy, Attorney and Artist, participated in our Diploma in Art Profession Law and Ethics (DipAPLE) and is now a frequent contributor to our blog. Read about her varied career as well as her favorite aspects of the course.  Can you tell us a little bit about your career and background? I am an American […]

New issue of Art Antiquity and Law out in April

Posted on: April 7, 2021 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

The April issue of Art Antiquity and Law is now finalised, and hard copy will soon be winging its way to subscribers. For those interested in subscribing, please see here. The April issue contains articles on a range of subjects: Oliver Lenaerts looks at the ways in which European competition rules apply to standardisation and […]

Museum ethics: when the law plays catch up

Posted on: March 23, 2021 by Alexander Herman

Readers of this blog will know of our interest in a particular piece of EU law that came into effect throughout the EU territory on 28th December 2020. This predated the end of the Brexit Transition Period by three days and so applied to the UK as well. The legislation was Regulation 2019/880 on the […]

Important collection of Jerusalem Museum kept intact

Posted on: March 16, 2021 by Emily Gould

Updated 6th April 2021 following costs ruling in favour of Hashava Foundation* Readers may recall the report by Meir Heller and Keren Abelow published earlier this year about the proposed sale of important artefacts from Jerusalem’s L.A. Mayer Museum of Islamic Art. We are very pleased to report that a resolution has been reached in […]

NFTs – a flash in the pan or a sign of things to come?

Posted on: March 9, 2021 by Emily Gould

Another week, another acronym for the art world. In the past year or so, whilst many AMPs (art market professionals) have grappled with getting to KYC (know your customer) in compliance with new AML (anti money-laundering) rules, they have also been faced with moving from the bustling world of art fairs and high street galleries […]

Report on Brexit seminar

Posted on: February 17, 2021 by Alexander Herman

Last week, we were happy to run a seminar called ‘Brexit, legal changes and the art world’ in conjunction with the London firm of Hunters Law LLP. The topic is obviously one of great interest these days as the UK grapples with a post-EU existence. There were a number of important changes that were brought […]

US Supreme Court remands Guelph Treasure case

Posted on: February 12, 2021 by Stephanie Drawdy

The much-anticipated ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court in the Welfenschatz (or ‘Guelph Treasure’) restitution case (previously discussed here) was issued on 3 February 2021, rendering precedent on the interpretation of the ‘expropriation exception’ of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA).[1] Enacted to lift the “baseline presumption of immunity” given to foreign states under the […]