Latest IAL News

September brought important developments for collections management

Posted on: October 4, 2019 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

September was, as usual, an eventful month for the art world and the cultural heritage sector. After the lull of the summer months, there were a number of interesting events and developments that took place both in the UK and abroad. Today, we will be looking at two developments that were important from a collections […]

Japanese Museum claims title to the Reynolds painting stolen in UK

Posted on: October 1, 2019 by Makoto Shimada

According to recent articles in the Antiques Trade Gazette, Art Newspaper and several other English papers, a painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds stolen in the UK has ended up in Japan at the collection of the Fuji Tokyo Art Museum (“the Museum”). The Museum claims that it purchased the work with valid title. Facts In […]

Censorship during Rio de Janeiro’s Book Biennial was not upheld by Brazil’s Supreme Court

Posted on: September 27, 2019 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

It might come as a surprise that a Marvel comic book for children could stir so much controversy to the point of having the mayor of one of Brazil’s largest cities ordering its seizure from a book fair, followed by a rushed lawsuit at the state courts and a subsequent ruling from the country’s Supreme […]

Dispute over the Isleworth Mona Lisa goes to Italian courtrooms

Posted on: September 25, 2019 by Eleonora Chielli

The Court of Florence is dealing with a case involving the ‘Isleworth Mona Lisa’, a painting attributed to Leonardo, though with some uncertainty. Whilst the question of attribution is not the focus of this post, it should be noted that following a debate lasting for more than a century about the attribution of this painting, […]

Developments from the US-China Trade War and how the art market is affected

Posted on: September 19, 2019 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

In what at first glance seems like a distant topic for cultural heritage and art law, the ongoing trade war between the US and China has escalated further with clear implications for the art market and many other countries as well. We have previously covered this topic here and here, when last year the threat […]

A report from two major Holocaust-Looted Art Events in London

Posted on: September 17, 2019 by Emily Gould and Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

London played host earlier this month to two fascinating events relating to Holocaust-looted art and restitution. Both events were packed, truly marking the beginning of a new academic year and the return from summer holidays. IAL attended both events and here is our account of the enlightening discussions which took place. At the V&A, on […]

ICOM postpones vote on new ‘museum’ definition

Posted on: September 9, 2019 by Emily Gould

What is the role of the museum in 21st century society? Not a simple question, certainly, but one which a standing committee of ICOM, the International Council of Museums, has been actively considering for almost a year in pursuit of a new way of defining a ‘museum’. The process was intended to have reached its […]

Art loans: a linchpin for the sector in challenging times?

Posted on: September 5, 2019 by Emily Gould

It’s not often that the topic of art loans makes headline news, even in the cultural sector. Although loans of works of art and cultural artefacts represent the lifeblood of many institutions across the globe, they generally proceed under the radar, with little fuss or fanfare. The occasional blockbuster exhibition might attract press comment, drawing […]

Interview with IAL Alumna Kathy Richmond, Registrar at the Museum of London

Posted on: September 3, 2019 by Kiri Cragin Folwell

Kathy Richmond, Registrar at the Museum of London, participated in our Diploma in Art Law and Collections Management. Read about her background working with National and non-National museums in the UK and her experience studying on the Diploma course at the Institute of Art and Law. Can you tell us a little bit about your […]

Notre Dame Fire leads to environmental lawsuit

Posted on: August 27, 2019 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

Following the devastating fire at Notre Dame Cathedral last April in Paris, which we covered here, and in yet another example of how climate activism has recently become entangled with the arts and the cultural sector, there has been strong criticism from one environmental activist group in Paris regarding lead poisoning concerns. In case you […]