Category Archives: Planning

Latest issue of Art Antiquity & Law available now

Posted on: September 8, 2020 by Julia Rodrigues Casella Hommes

We are pleased to announce that the latest issue (Vol XXV, 2) of our journal Art Antiquity & Law is available now, please see below for details on subscriptions and access.  Paul Kearns provides the readers with a comprehensive panorama of the international legal regulations on freedom of artistic expression, a fundamental but much overlooked and […]

Certosa di Trisulti: Court maintained the controversial lease

Posted on: August 27, 2020 by Eleonora Chielli

The Administrative Regional Court of Lazio (TAR Lazio) has now ruled on the dispute over the controversial lease of Certosa di Trisulti, previously discussed here. The Dignitatis Humanae Institute (DHI) has been allowed to maintain the lease and management of this public cultural heritage site in Italy. The controversy began on the 16th of October […]

What is a listed building? The Supreme Court provides clarity

Posted on: June 4, 2020 by Rebecca Reynolds

The IAL has been closely following the case of Mr Dill and the two lead urns in its passage through the courts over the past two years. Mr Dill sold the urns in 2009 without knowing that they were individually listed and therefore their removal required listed building consent. Having lost at the High Court […]

“Thinking without a bannister”: reflections on the Court of Appeal ruling on the Airports National Policy Statement Designation

Posted on: May 20, 2020 by Pamela Campion

In these extraordinary times of the Covid-19 pandemic, the ascendant market-oriented ideologies of the last five decades have been placed on lock down. We are all being forced to think about the society we live in and which outcomes should be prioritised. How do we balance the health of citizens against the growth of the […]

A Round-Up of Recent Historic Environment Developments

Posted on: March 27, 2020 by Rebecca Reynolds

The fate of Stonehenge and the A303 has reared its ugly head again, or perhaps not. When the Chancellor announced the Budget on 11 March 2020 he confirmed the Government’s continued commitment to the Stonehenge scheme, saying it is “going to get it done”. However, this does not mean the scheme has been given the […]

Certosa di Trisulti and Steve Bannon: The Controversial Lease of a Public Cultural Heritage Site

Posted on: January 31, 2020 by Eleonora Chielli

The History of Certosa di Trisulti Certosa di Trisulti is a historic building in Collepardo, a small town in the Southern Latium, where Pope Innocenzo III founded its eponymous chartherhouse in 1204. It contains precious artworks and a pharmacy dating back to the 17th century. It was declared a National Monument in 1879. Recent Developments In […]

A Listed Building – or is it? The recent Court of Appeal judgement in Dill

Posted on: January 16, 2019 by Rebecca Reynolds

While owning and living in a listed building may be a quaint dream for some of us, they do come with a fair amount of constraints, restrictions and headaches when it comes to undertaking repairs, renovations or even selling items held within them. Many an owner of a large stately home has found himself on […]

HS2 and archaeology: an unexpected opportunity

Posted on: November 23, 2018 by Rebecca Reynolds

Large infrastructure projects are always very divisive, and this is certainly true when it comes to the HS2, the high-speed rail link that’s being built between London and Birmingham. Many have objected to its cost, questioned the extent it will benefit the communities and economies of the areas it connects and its environmental impact. Much […]

Planning dispute: Oswestry Hill Fort

Posted on: July 4, 2015 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

A dispute has arisen in the wake of the approval by the planning inspectorate of Shropshire council of an application to build 117 homes on the fringe of Old Oswestry Hill Fort, a 3,000-year-old earthwork dubbed “the Stonehenge of the Iron Age”. It is said to have been the birthplace of Queen Ganhumara – Guinevere […]