Tag Archives: war

Law, Restitution and the Benin Bronzes

Posted on: December 23, 2018 by Alexander Herman

In 1897, British troops marched on Benin City, capital of the fabled West African kingdom of Benin, ruled over by a powerful Oba. The attack was called a ‘punitive expedition’ because it was a retaliatory response to the Oba having massacred a British delegation of eight officials, two traders and local escorts the previous month. […]

Planning for the unthinkable: Protecting cultural assets in extremis

Posted on: December 3, 2018 by Emily Gould

It barely seems possible that we are fast approaching the first anniversary of the UK’s ratification of the Hague Convention 1954. 12th December 2017 marked the entry into force of the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Act 2017, which saw the UK, finally, making a formal commitment to adhere to the Convention’s obligations for the protection […]

Culture as a unifier: the Ethiopian manuscripts

Posted on: February 9, 2018 by Alexander Herman

The story begins 150 years ago. In 1868, deep in the deserts of east Africa, a British expedition led by General Robert Napier, was attacking the capital of the Abyssinian Empire, Maqdala, ruled over by King Tewodros. The British were looking to teach Tewodros a lesson for having imprisoned a number of British envoys and […]

Progress for the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

Posted on: November 2, 2016 by Emily Gould

As promised in our blog post in early July, we wanted to keep you updated on the progress through Parliament of the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill, which will enable the UK, finally, to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention. The Bill received its second reading in the House of Commons this week (31st October). It […]

Good news as UK to finally adopt Hague Convention

Posted on: May 19, 2016 by Alexander Herman

At long last… It was announced in the Queen’s speech yesterday that the UK Parliament would see the introduction of a bill to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. This is a positive sign and one that had been hinted at (with little more) by […]

UK’s new Emergency Heritage Management Project

Posted on: November 18, 2015 by Alexander Herman

Officially launched last month, the UK’s Emergency Heritage Management Project will look to help preserve and recover cultural objects and edifices in Iraq that are under threat. In the words of the press release: “It will create a team of local experts to assess, document and stabilise afflicted sites in Iraq, and help begin the process […]

Restitution as an art in itself

Posted on: October 2, 2015 by Alexander Herman

An art exhibition in Norway is built around a work by Henri Matisse, Blue Dress in a Yellow Armchair, and yet the work isn’t even there. The Henie Onstad Museum returned the work in March 2014 to the heirs of Paul Rosenberg, the famous Parisian art dealer whose collection of masterpieces had been looted by the Nazis […]

Gurlitt amongst the Poppies

Posted on: November 7, 2014 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

Yesterday was the Annual General Meeting of the UK Registrars Group, held at the Banqueting Suite inside the Tower of London. The Group had invited the IAL to present on the topic of the Gurlitt Art Trove. The talk, delivered by Alex Herman, was entitled The Gurlitt Affair: Some Thoughts on the Legal Issues and dealt with the circumstances […]

Fight to save historic battlefield

Posted on: January 10, 2014 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

A campaign is afoot to try to stop the sale of fields which were the site of an historic battle. The 10.5 acre fields were the location of the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471, in which Richard III fought as the then 18-year-old Duke of Gloucester. Members of Tewkesbury Battlefield Society are seeking to amass between […]

IAL seminars: ‘Human Remains and the Law’ (13 Dec) and ‘Culture and Conflict’ (27 Jan 2014)

Posted on: November 12, 2013 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

‘Human Remains and the Law’ – 13th December 2013 – London A one-day conference with the generous support of the Natural History Museum The treatment of human remains, whether contained in museum collections or discovered during the course of building or other works, gives rise to a host of moral, ethical and legal issues. Should […]