Tag Archives: rebecca reynolds

A spate of coins – the recent discovery of the Hambleden Hoard

Posted on: May 3, 2019 by Rebecca Reynolds

It is fitting that, following Geoffrey Bennett’s last post on the Treasure Act consultations in the UK, this piece would also touch on a topic close to our hearts: the law of treasure. For four men in England last month the dream of finding treasure became a reality. While partaking in a four day long […]

Judicial review undertaken for HMS Victory salvage

Posted on: April 10, 2019 by Rebecca Reynolds

Treasure, bounty, pirates – these words conjure up romantic adventures in peoples’ minds, none the more so than when they relate to historically important wrecks. An example of this is the HMS Victory which sank in 1744 in the Channel on its way back from a mission to relieve British ships blocked in the River […]

Heritage Crime Day with Historic England

Posted on: February 2, 2019 by Rebecca Reynolds

On 24 January 2019 IAL Senior Researcher Emily Gould and I attended a workshop on heritage crime organised by Historic England. The aim of the workshop was to present to the attendees the various types of heritage crime that can be committed, how the perpetrators can be convicted and appropriate sentences to be handed down […]

A Listed Building – or is it? The recent Court of Appeal judgement in Dill

Posted on: January 16, 2019 by Rebecca Reynolds

While owning and living in a listed building may be a quaint dream for some of us, they do come with a fair amount of constraints, restrictions and headaches when it comes to undertaking repairs, renovations or even selling items held within them. Many an owner of a large stately home has found himself on […]

Art of the view: Tate Modern and the privacy of its neighbours

Posted on: December 6, 2018 by Rebecca Reynolds

When Tate Modern opened its new extension in the summer of 2016, the Blavatnik Building, the art world applauded and celebrated the new space which allows for increased permanent and temporary exhibition space, another restaurant as well as education rooms. However, there is now a more contentious side to this building. The building has a […]

HS2 and archaeology: an unexpected opportunity

Posted on: November 23, 2018 by Rebecca Reynolds

Large infrastructure projects are always very divisive, and this is certainly true when it comes to the HS2, the high-speed rail link that’s being built between London and Birmingham. Many have objected to its cost, questioned the extent it will benefit the communities and economies of the areas it connects and its environmental impact. Much […]