Tag Archives: painting

A Spanish Tug-of-War

Posted on: May 8, 2015 by Alexander Herman

An interesting recent article in the New York Times recounts the struggle between two Spanish Museums over the right to display four paintings, including two masterpieces of European art (Hieronymus Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights and Rogier van der Weyden’s Descent from the Cross). The works have been held at the Prado Museum in Madrid since being sent […]

Dutch Restitutions Committee rejects Stettiner claim

Posted on: April 17, 2015 by Alexander Herman

Last month, the Dutch Restitutions Committee published its recommendation regarding a claim brought forward by the heirs of the three Stettiner siblings who ran the Stettiner Gallery in Paris until it was closed during the Second World War. The claim involved a portrait by Salomon Koninck (1609-1656) entitled Old Man with Beard, which currently forms part […]

Banksy, Niobe and the ‘duped’ man from Gaza

Posted on: April 8, 2015 by Alexander Herman

Newspapers around the globe last week reported on the story of a Palestinian man from Gaza, Rabie Dardouna, who had unwittingly sold a door with a Banksy mural on it. Banksy had reportedly taken a tour of Gaza following the 2014 Israel-Gaza War and put up a number of characteristic works on bombed-out buildings. This […]

Artworks now considered depreciable assets in Japan

Posted on: March 25, 2015 by Makoto Shimada

Over the last couple of months, Japanese companies have been flocking to galleries to purchase inexpensive artworks. This trend is a result of a significant governmental change in relation to taxation policy which was adopted from January 2015. According to the newly amended Corporate and Income Tax Law Interpretive Regulations announced by the National Tax […]

The Bern-Germany-Bavaria Agreement on Gurlitt works

Posted on: November 25, 2014 by Alexander Herman

As reported yesterday, an agreement has been reached between the Bern Museum of Fine Arts (or Kunstmuseum), the German Republic and the Bavarian State on how to deal with the works of art bequeathed by Cornelius Gurlitt in his will to the Museum. A summary of the agreement is now available in English. In general […]

Appeal of decision on Rupert Bunny painting

Posted on: May 16, 2014 by Alexander Herman

This week, the Court of Appeal of Victoria in Australia, rendered an appeal decision regarding a painting by the celebrated Australian impressionist Rupert Bunny. The work has sometimes been referred to as ‘Female Reading in Sun”. The case, Levy v. Watt [2014] VSCA 60, which came down on 14 May 2014, involved an analysis of […]

Picasso painting to stay in Four Seasons Restaurant… for now

Posted on: May 9, 2014 by Hélène Deslauriers

In Manhattan, Justice Matthew Cooper of the New York State Supreme Court ruled recently to prevent the owners of the Seagram Building from removing, at least for the time being, a stage curtain painted by Picasso stating there is ‘clearly a danger of irreprable injury’. The painting, known as Le Tricorne was executed by Picasso […]

Stubbs paintings saved for the nation

Posted on: November 12, 2013 by Ruth Redmond-Cooper

Two paintings by George Stubbs sold at auction in February this year have been saved for the nation following the imposition by the DCMS of a temporary bar on their export.  The paintings, dating back to 1773, of a dingo and a kangaroo sold for £5.5m and were the first depictions of these animals in […]